THE MAKING OF FLYOVER ICELAND

Magic in the Air: Getting the Shot

Each and every FlyOver shot is complex, risky and yet ultimately incredibly rewarding. Each shot involves countless hours of research, dreaming, choreography and planning. For the talented international crew hard at work filming FlyOver Iceland, there's a healthy dose of 'magic' as well.

All told, the film production team aims to shoot 30 epic, unforgettable and inspiring locations in the remotest corners of Iceland. Each must stand alone in terms of beauty and thrill. However, not all of them will make the eight-minute final film. The standards are incredibly high!

We go deep into the process as we journey with the crew to the stunning Goðafoss waterfall in northern Iceland. Goðafoss means "waterfall of the gods" in Icelandic, and it's wide and powerful. The Skjálfandafljót River, which has its source deep in the Icelandic highlands, plunges 12 metres (39 feet) over a width of 30 metres (98 feet). In early summer, like when this shot is being captured, water levels are the highest of the year.

A group of kayakers celebrate their accomplishments.

Photo: The team of expert kayakers brave enough to drop Goðafoss Waterfall for the FlyOver Iceland camera.

A close view of a camera attached to the underside of a red helicopter.

Photo: The special ShotOver gimbal houses a RED camera and is attached to the front left of the helicopter. It's managed inside the helicopter by expert aerial camera operator John Trapman.

A crew of the country's most expert whitewater kayakers have been called in to drop the massive falls at supreme high water, while a helicopter whizzes just over their heads. It's a complex dance that involves risk on so many levels. Will it work? And will it make the cut?

Meet the crew, see inside the production process and find out how they make the magic happen in Getting the Shot.

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